Saints sonnets (2/4)

par John Donne. Traduit de l’anglais (GB) par Pierre Vinclair. Lire le premier épisode.

.

.

V.

I am a little world made cunningly
Of elements and an angelic sprite,
But black sin hath betray’d to endless night
My world’s both parts, and oh both parts must die.
You which beyond that heaven which was most high
Have found new spheres, and of new lands can write,
Pour new seas in mine eyes, that so I might
Drown my world with my weeping earnestly,
Or wash it, if it must be drown’d no more.
But oh it must be burnt; alas the fire
Of lust and envy have burnt it heretofore,
And made it fouler; let their flames retire,
And burn me O Lord, with a fiery zeal
Of thee and thy house, which doth in eating heal.

Je suis un petit monde, astucieusement
Composé de matière, avec l’esprit d’un ange ;
Mais le péché noir a livré les deux parties
De mon monde à la nuit sans fin : oh qu’elles meurent !
Vous qui trouvâtes après les plus hauts Cieux sphères
Nouvelles, qui nouveaux pays pourriez décrire,
Versez nouvelles mers dans mes yeux, que je puisse
Noyer mon monde sous mes pleurs sincèrement,
Ou le laver, s’il ne doit pas se noyer plus.
Il doit brûler ; hélas le feu de la luxure
Et de la jalousie l’ont brûlé jusqu’ici
Jusqu’à putréfaction ; que leurs flammes s’en aillent :
Fais-moi brûler, Ô Dieu, du zèle passionné
Pour toi et ta maison qui, en dévorant, soigne.

.

.

VI.

This is my play’s last scene; here heavens appoint
My pilgrimage’s last mile; and my race,
Idly, yet quickly run, hath this last pace,
My span’s last inch, my minute’s latest point;
And gluttonous death will instantly unjoint
My body and my soul, and I shall sleep a space;
But my ever-waking part shall see that face
Whose fear already shakes my every joint.
Then, as my soul to’ heaven, her first seat, takes flight,
And earth-born body in the earth shall dwell,
So fall my sins, that all may have their right,
To where they’re bred, and would press me, to hell.
Impute me righteous, thus purg’d of evil,
For thus I leave the world, the flesh, the devil.

C’est la scène finale de ma pièce ; ici
Les cieux fixent l’ultime borne du chemin ;
Ma course, oisive et rapide, trouve son terme,
Le dernier pouce mien, la dernière seconde ;
La mort gloutonne va tout de suite disjoindre
Mon âme de mon corps, je vais dormir un temps ;
Mais ma part éveillée pourra voir ce visage
Dont la peur déjà secoue toutes mes jointures.
Puis, mon âme au ciel, son premier siège, s’envole,
Et mon corps né de terre en la terre retourne,
Lors où tous ont leur droit, que tombent mes péchés :
Où ils sont nés et m’auraient pressé — en enfer.
Impute-moi justice et purge-moi du mal :
Car je quitte ici-bas, la chair et le démon.

.

.

VII.

At the round earth’s imagin’d corners, blow
Your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise
From death, you numberless infinities
Of souls, and to your scatter’d bodies go;
All whom the flood did, and fire shall o’erthrow,
All whom war, dearth, age, agues, tyrannies,
Despair, law, chance hath slain, and you whose eyes
Shall behold God and never taste death’s woe.
But let them sleep, Lord, and me mourn a space,
For if above all these my sins abound,
’Tis late to ask abundance of thy grace
When we are there; here on this lowly ground
Teach me how to repent; for that’s as good
As if thou hadst seal’d my pardon with thy blood.

Aux coins imaginés de la Terre ronde, anges,
Soufflez dans vos trompettes, et relevez-vous,
Levez-vous de la mort, infinités sans nombre
D’âmes, et rejoignez vos corps éparpillés ;
Ceux que déluge a pu — que feu va — renverser ;
Ceux que guerre, besoin, fièvre, âge, tyrannies,
Loi, désespoir, hasard ont tués — vous dont l’œil
Verra Dieu sans goûter le malheur de mourir.
Non, laisse-les dormir, et moi pleurer un temps,
Seigneur : si mes péchés plus que les leurs abondent,
C’est trop tard pour prier abondance de grâces
Une fois rendus là ; apprends-moi ici-bas,
Comment me repentir ; car cela vaut autant
Que si tu scellais mon pardon avec ton sang.

.

.

VIII.

If poisonous minerals, and if that tree
Whose fruit threw death on else immortal us,
If lecherous goats, if serpents envious
Cannot be damn’d, alas, why should I be?
Why should intent or reason, born in me,
Make sins, else equal, in me more heinous?
And mercy being easy, and glorious
To God, in his stern wrath why threatens he?
But who am I, that dare dispute with thee,
O God? Oh, of thine only worthy blood
And my tears, make a heavenly Lethean flood,
And drown in it my sins’ black memory.
That thou remember them, some claim as debt;
I think it mercy, if thou wilt forget.

Si le minerai vénéneux et si cet arbre
Dont le fruit, d’immortels, nous mit à mort nous autres,
Si les serpents jaloux, si les chèvres lubriques
Ne seront pas damnés, pourquoi donc le serais-je ?
En quoi l’intention, la raison, nées en moi,
Rendraient mêmes péchés, en moi, plus haïssables ?
La pitié lui étant aisée et glorieuse,
Pourquoi me menacer, Dieu, de son ire austère ?
Mais qui suis-je après tout pour te chercher querelle,
Ô Dieu ? Avec ton sang, oh ! qui seul est valable
Et mes larmes, compose un Léthé pour les Cieux,
Pour noyer, noir, le souvenir de mes péchés.
D’aucuns réclament que tu te souviennes d’eux,
Si tu veux m’oublier j’y verrai ta pitié.

.

.

IX.

Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;
For those whom thou think’st thou dost overthrow
Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.
From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be,
Much pleasure; then from thee much more must flow,
And soonest our best men with thee do go,
Rest of their bones, and soul’s delivery.
Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men,
And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell,
And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well
And better than thy stroke; why swell’st thou then?
One short sleep past, we wake eternally
And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.

Ne sois pas fière, Mort, et si certains te disent
Puissante ou effrayante, eh bien tu ne l’es pas ;
Car tous ceux que tu crois renverser, pauvre Mort,
Ne meurent — pas plus que tu ne peux me tuer.
Repos et sommeil, qui sont de toi des images,
Font tant de bien : de toi en jaillira bien plus ;
Les meilleurs au plus tôt s’en vont à tes côtés,
Pour reposer leurs os et délivrer leur âme.
Esclave des destin, sort, rois, désespérés…
Tu dois avec poison, mal et guerre habiter ;
Les charmes, le pavot nous font autant dormir
Et bien mieux que tes coups : pourquoi fais-tu la fière ?
Un court sommeil, puis nous veillerons pour toujours
Et la mort s’éteindra ; Mort, c’est toi qui mourras.

.

.

.

.

Votre commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l’aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l’aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l’aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Connexion à %s